Project Testing Interface: JavaScript

This document outlines common ways to meet the Project Testing Interface requirements for JavaScript. Each JavaScript project must be able to do:

  • Codestyle checks.
  • Execute Tests and Code Coverage
  • Package Tarball Generation
  • Documentation Generation
  • Validate dependency licenses

Projects which are browser based must also be able to do:

  • Unit tests in Firefox and Chromium.

Projects which are server based must also be able to do:

  • Unit tests in Node.js.

Projects which require translation must also be able to do:

  • Translation import/export and merge for translated objects.

Specific commands

The following commands must be supported at the root of a clean tree, in order to initialize your project.

npm install
This command installs all of the project’s dependencies.

To drive the above required steps, the following commands should be supported at the root of an initialized tree.

npm test
This command executes all available test suites, and generate appropriate code coverage reports.
npm run lint
This command performs codestyle checks against the project.
npm pack
This command generates a release tarball.
npm publish <tarball> --no-scripts
This command will publish a release tarball to npm. It may not be necessary for all projects.
npm run document
This command builds documentation for the project.

The following commands are still under discussion:

npm run license
This command ensures that no incompatible licenses have accidentally been included.
npm run translate
This command imports translations into this project, if necessary.

Project Setup

node and npm version

We support the current version of node.js and npm available in the LTS releases of Ubuntu. As of this writing, these are Node v0.10.29 and npm v1.4.21. While these versions are no longer supported, this restriction is imposed by our package maintainers.

npm scripts

All JavaScript specific testing tools are invoked via NPM package scripts. These are useful because they provide a ‘virtual’ runtime environment whose dependencies are contained entirely in the project directory. They also allow us to create a consistent interface between the commands that are invoked by our build, and the tools required by the project.

Requirements Listing

Each project should list its runtime, peer, and development dependencies in package.json and (if applicable) bower.json.

dependencies
Packages required by your project to run in production. These should never use fuzzy version matching.
devDependencies
Packages that are required by your project during the test and build phase. These should never use fuzzy version matching.
peerDependencies
Packages that are used to run your project, but whose version does not strictly matter. For example, eslint-config-openstack has eslint as a peer dependency.

Virtual Environment Management

To support sensible testing, we use npm’s environment management, as it permits the installation of dependencies by project.

Build Step Details

The following describes each individual command, what it should do, and its expected output.

Codestyle Checks

Command:npm run lint

OpenStack requires the custom npm script ‘lint’ to execute our codestyle checks. The tool we use is called ESLint, and our rules are published to npm as eslint-config-openstack.

Executing Tests and Code Coverage

Command:npm test

OpenStack requires a sane testing and code coverage strategy for each project, though we do not prescribe the tools and coverage threshold, as these may differ based on circumstance and project type. Generated test reports should be placed in ./reports in your projects’ root directory. Generated coverage output should similarly be placed in ./cover.

Package Tarball Generation

Command:npm pack

OpenStack uses npm pack to generate a release tarball, which will compile all files listed in package.json. If your project requires concatenation, minification, or any other preprocessing to create a valid tarball, you may use the npm prepublish hook to trigger these steps.

All packages should include:

  • A README
  • A LICENSE file
  • All source code

Generate Documentation

Command:npm run document

In order to reuse existing templates, styles, and tooling, OpenStack uses Sphinx to generate our JavaScript Project documentation.

In addition to the normal PTI Documentation requirements, Javascript projects are recommended to provide an npm run document command for developer convenience that should:

  • Either install any needed distro dependencies from the doc tag in bindep.txt or emit an error if they are not installed.
  • Install Python dependencies for Sphinx from doc/requirements.txt.
  • Execute sphinx-build -b html doc/source doc/build

The project infrastructure will not use npm to build the documentation. Therefore it is STRONGLY discouraged for people to put additional logic into the npm run document command. Additional logic needed around Sphinx generation should go into Sphinx plugins which should be listed in doc/requirements.txt.

Generate Release Notes

Command:npm run releasenotes

OpenStack uses reno for generating release notes.

In addition to the normal PTI Documentation requirements, Javascript projects are recommended to provide an npm run releasenotes command for developer convenience that should:

  • Either install any needed distro dependencies from the releasenotes tag in bindep.txt or emit an error if they are not installed.
  • Execute: sphinx-build -a -E -W -d releasenotes/build/doctrees -b html releasenotes/source releasenotes/build/html

The project infrastructure will not use npm run releasenotes to build the release notes. Therefore it is STRONGLY discouraged for people to put additional logic into the npm run releasenotes command. Additional logic needed should go into reno.